Southend

A telegraph station.

Population,
1473
Hotels.—
Ship, Chas. Woosnam, family and commercial hotel, a very comfortable house, and deservedly recommended; Royal Hotel, near the railway station.

A picturesque village in the county of Essex, situated at the mouth of the Thames, nearly opposite Sheerness. It has lately become known as a watering-place. Several handsome rows of houses have been erected, and bathing machines established. The company that assemble here in the season will be found more select than at Margate, but it suffers severely in its climate when an easterly wind prevails. There are assembly rooms, theatre, library, a wooden terrace pier, 1,500 feet long, with a causeway 4,000 feet by 14 feet (which enables passengers to land at low water, and forms besides a pleasant promenade for those who love to enjoy the salubrity of the sea-breeze), and several places of worship. The view of the Thames from Southend is very pleasant, and the town is gradually rising in importance. It is situated on a wooded, hill; and the beautiful terrace, commonly called New Southend, being built on a considerable eminence, gives the town an elegant appearance. The houses from this position command a delightful and extensive view of the sea, Nore, Medway, Sheerness, and the panoramic views of the shipping and steamers which are constantly passing up or down the river. The air generally is considered very dry and salubrious.

The vicinity presents several temptations to the pedestrian, and though the surrounding scenery be not characterised by many striking landscapes, the prospects are varied and interesting. In addition to daily steam communication with the Metropolis, Southend is also well provided with railway accommodation to and from Bishopsgate, Fenchurch Street and Chalk Farm or Camdem Road.

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